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March 30
Speaking at Microsoft Ignite #MSIgnite

It’s official, as of today, there are only 34 days until Microsoft’s biggest conference, Ignite!  As we lead up to the conference, there are so many exciting things happening, so if you have registered, I definitely recommend staying tuned to what’s going on when you log into the conference site.  The schedule builder will be coming online soon, and if the last SharePoint conference is any indication, there will probably be a lot of useful social tools on the site, so that we can get to know each other and the speakers before the conference even starts!  Also, I’m excited to announce that I’ll be presenting some sessions there!

Here are my three sessions:


1. MVP Panel:

SharePoint On-Premises, Online and Everything in Between

Speakers: Christian Buckley, Christopher McNulty, Dan Holme, Jennifer Ann Mason, Laura Rogers

Type: Best Practices

Audience: IT Influencers & Implementers

Topic: Deployment & Implementation

Imagine five great minds coming together to talk about Microsoft SharePoint across the board, be it within Microsoft Office 365, in Microsoft Azure, on-premises and certainly hybrid. Via a panel Q&A format, these MVP experts expose how online and hybrid improvements increase both deployment scenarios and value. This session is designed to help ITIs and ITDMs find the right cloud formula to deploy based on practical business and technical considerations. This is a must-not-miss session for any IT pro!


2. Breakout Session:

Driving User Adoption from a Technical Standpoint for SharePoint, Exchange and Office 365

Speakers: Laura Rogers, Lori Gowin

Type: Best Practices

Audience: IT Influencers & Implementers

Topic: Usage & Adoption

Good news, IT pros, there are useful technical configurations in the SharePoint administration console that will improve user satisfaction and increase productivity and adoption. Topics covered and demonstrated include defining user audiences, improving Microsoft Office integration, and managing available apps. This session uses real-world experience to help you define a specific action list that may be used to optimize user experience and drive user adoption.

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3. Pre-Day session (Sunday):

End-to-End OneDrive for Business Planning, Deployment, Best Practices and Adoption Techniques

Speakers: Laura Rogers, Todd Klindt

Type: Pre-Day
(additional fee required)

Audience: IT Influencers & Implementers

Topic: Deployment & Implementation

This pre-day session covers IT planning and adoption considerations to properly deploy Microsoft OneDrive for Business. The topics include ways to synchronize your on-premises directory data to the cloud to achieve identity SSO (single sign-on); rollout of OneDrive for Business across your organization (training, apps, sync client); getting other Office 365 suite-level features running in conjunction with OneDrive for Business; and overall management for OneDrive for Business in production across all your users. The training, too, will cover numerous deployment scenarios especially hybrid.

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To read my previous blog post about this conference, you can click here.

See you all there!

February 24
Speaking at SharePoint Evolution Conference

Square-Web-Banner

This April, I’m very excited to be invited again to speak at the SharePoint Evolution Conference in London.  This is the largest SharePoint conference in the world in 2015! 

There really is no conference like this one.  Besides the fact that it’s just awesome and it brings together the top experts in the world, the conference also provides attendees with a set of DVDs of all conference sessions afterwards!  Also, as a bonus, a new 4th day has been added as a free dev day for Office 365 developers.

See you there!

My sessions are:

Making the Most of the Out-of-Box Web Parts

There are over fifty out-of-the-box web parts in the enterprise version of SharePoint!  In this session, you will learn just how flexible and useful these web parts are.  Not only will you get a detailed look at the Filter, Excel, Social, Rollup and Media web parts, but you will learn about a few new ones in SharePoint 2013 such as the Content Search Web Part.  You will then learn how to customize some of these web parts, see examples, demonstrations, and learn about new features.   All of this is done without writing any code.  Push SharePoint as far as you can using out-of-box functionality! 

Creating a Business Solution Workflow, Part 1

Forms and documents are everywhere in your organization, and a lot of them must go through an approval process. SharePoint is such a flexible platform, it provides us with multiple methods that can be used to build our processes. In this session, learn about these different out-of-box ways to create a workflow around a form approval process. Laura Rogers will show you the various alternatives when creating an approval workflow: content approval, out of box workflows, and the task process designer in a SharePoint Designer workflow. Quickly create and implement intuitive workflows for your critical IT and business systems, with no programming involved! The concepts in this session are applicable to SharePoint 2010, 2013 and Office 365.

This is part 1 of a 2 part presentation. This first part has only the simple and purely out-of-box settings and functionalities.

Creating a Business Solution Workflow, Part 2

Forms and documents are everywhere in your organization, and a lot of them must go through an approval process.  SharePoint is such a flexible platform, it provides us with multiple methods that can be used to build our processes.  Quickly create and implement intuitive workflows for your critical IT and business systems, with no programming involved!  In this advanced session, learn about creating a completely custom new hire approval process.  In this part 2 session, Laura Rogers will build out an HR onboarding workflow in SharePoint Designer, using a complex example that involves a process with both serial and parallel components, with multiple workflows.  The concepts in this session are applicable to SharePoint 2010, 2013 and Office 365. 

This is part 2 of a 2 part presentation.  This second part has only advanced concepts geared towards those who are already familiar with SharePoint Designer workflows.

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February 19
Content Search Web Part with Query String

In many SharePoint solutions, Query String URLs are very useful in being able to create something like a page or dashboard that displays different content depending on a value used in the URL of the page.  I decided that I wanted to create a web part on each customer site on our internal SharePoint site, to show all documents related to that customer from anywhere in the site collection.  The Content Search Web Part is perfect, and I wanted it to be part of a template, so that just whatever the site was named, that was the keyword that was used.  Also, I wanted to create a company policy web part page that would send a department name as a query string, and have the web part show the appropriate files. 

This applies to SharePoint 2013 and Office 365, the enterprise versions.

Both of these types of solutions can be achieved with the Content Search Web Part, but since the web part does not allow Web Part Connections, it is a little more difficult to figure out.  As a matter of fact, I scoured the internet for about 15 minutes and couldn’t find any solutions to this.  So, here’s the answer.

Query String Filter:

  1. In the Content Search Web Part’s web part toolpane, click the Change Query button.
    image
  2. I start by choosing Select a Query: Documents and Restrict by app: Don’t restrict results by app.  I want to show all files in the farm that the logged in user has access to.
    SNAGHTML2f4a67b
  3. Click Switch to Advanced Mode (at the top right in the above screenshot).
  4. In the Keyword filter drop-down, choose Value of a parameter from URL.  Click Add keyword filter.  Notice that now the query in the query text box says {QueryString.MyParameter1}.
    SNAGHTML2f63699
  5. Change MyParameter1 to your own word.  Mine is going to be called Department, so I simply change it to {QueryString.Department}.  This isn’t the final product, but I want you to see how it works.  Click OK, and then in the Web Part toolpane click OK.
  6. Now change the URL of the page you’re on, to add the query string.  My page is called policies.aspx and is in my Site Pages library: http://rtm.contoso.com/SitePages/policies.aspx
    With the query string, it’s
    http://rtm.contoso.com/SitePages/policies.aspx?department=accounting
    This will show me any file anywhere in SharePoint with the word accounting in it.  I don’t really want that, I want a specific column named Department to be equal to accounting or marketing or whatever.
  7. It helps that my column, Department is a site column, because once search indexes it, it will show up where I need it in this next step.  Go back into the web part toolpane and click Change Query again.
  8. Click the Property Filter drop-down, and choose Show all managed properties.
    SNAGHTML300e500
  9. Choose Department and then choose Equals, and then look at all of the options here!  I encourage you to play around and try some of these, but for this specific example, choose Value of a parameter from URL.  Click Add Property Filter.
    image
  10. So, now change the previous query to this instead:
    (IsDocument:"True" OR contentclass:"STS_ListItem") Department={QueryString.Department}

    Notice that now the web part will show items where the value of the department field, which is a site column used across many libraries in this case, is equal to the word you put in the query string. 
  11. Now when you save all these changes and view your page with the full URL with a query string, you see see the data change as you change the query string in the URL (as show in step 6)

Token From URL Filter

I have customers, and I have a sub-site for each customer, which has information about the projects we are working on, with associated files, notes, etc.  We are not using managed metadata or any kind of fancy navigation settings, these are just team sites.  I want each of these sites to have a web part that will show other related customer documents.  For example, the project managers keep all statements of work in a SOW library in another top level site, and there is other such information like that which is not stored on the customer sub-site.  The content search web part can be used to show data just pertaining to some information in the current URL, not necessarily the query string.  I name each site with the name of the customer, and I’m sure not to mash together words.  If the customer is something like Adventure Works, I use the URL Adventure_Works and not something like AW or AdventureWorks.  The search engine needs to be able to match these up. 

Here’s how:

  1. Repeat steps 1 through 3 above.
  2. In the Keyword Filter drop-down box, choose Value of a token from URL.  Click Add Keyword Filter.
    SNAGHTMLe8d453
  3. So what the heck is a token? It’s a piece of the URL, counting backwards from the end. 
    So, if my URL is:
    http://rtm.contoso.com/sites/projects/adventure_works/sitepages/default.aspx
    Here are the tokens:
    • Token 1 = default.aspx
    • Token 2 = sitepages
    • Token 3 = Adventure_works
    • Token 4 = projects
  4. Since Token 3 is the name of my customer, I change the query to say {URLToken.3}.  Click OK.
  5. You can also test this by looking at the TEST tab in the query builder.  If my site name (customer) is LSU, you can see that it shows lsu as part of the query text.
    SNAGHTML111b35c

Now you’ve seen a couple of different ways to configure the query in the Content Search web part.  Here are some additional related references:

I wrote a series of 4 blog posts a while back, explaining what query strings are and some ways to use them:

Here’s my post (with video) about the Content Search web part: SharePoint 2013 Web Part- Content Search

Also, on our weekly SharePoint Power Hour live show, we have covered the content search web part several times:

SharePoint Power Hour Episode 47- Search Center  - Duration- 47-01

SharePoint Power Hour- Episode 4 - Search features in SharePoint 2013  - Duration- 56-16

SharePoint Power Hour Episode 30- SharePoint 2013 Search Discussions  - Duration- 43-06

SharePoint Power Hour Episode 54 - Search Part 2  - Duration- 57-31

SharePoint Power Hour Episode 17- Guest Mark Watts joins us to talk about Display Templates in 2013

SharePoint Power Hour Episode 50 - Project Site rollups  - Duration- 1-01-31

February 10
Rackspace Sponsoring SharePint at SPTechCon

This evening, February 10, Rackspace will sponsor a party!

Golden-TicketExample

Here’s how it’s going to work…

At 6:45, there will be an local (Austin, San Antonio, Houston) SharePoint User Group meeting with an Ask the Experts Panel, in the Wedgewood Ballroom here at the conference hotel.  Everyone is invited. 

During this meeting, Rackspace will be handing out SIXTY (60) “Golden Tickets”.  The winners of these tickets will get free entry to the party (SharePint) at Austin Beer Works

There will be a FREE shuttle back and forth to Austin Beer Works from the conference hotel, for everyone (not just the ticket winners) from 7:30 to 10:30.  3009 Industrial Terrace, Suite 150, Austin, TX.  It’s about a mile and a half from the hotel.

Don’t worry, anyone can come even if you didn’t win a golden ticket.  It’s just $20 at the door for UNLIMITED BEER and a souvenir glass. 

Food:  Rackspace will provide appetizers (sliders) for free, and there will also be a WunderPig food truck there where you can purchase food directly.

In summary:

What: SharePint sponsored by Rackspace Hosting.

When: 2/10/2015, 8 to 10 PM

Where: Austin Beer Works

How: FREE shuttle back and forth during those 3 hours.

February 04
Mimicking Column Security

One of the most common questions I’ve ever gotten in my ten years using SharePoint is:

“How can I set a certain permission on a specific view or column (field)?”

In this blog post, I will start with a couple of very simple ways to do this, which can easily ramp up to some more fancy / tricky ways.  This is actually really easy with InfoPath, but I’m not going to use it in this example.  Just remember:

SECURITY DOES NOT ACTUALLY EXIST ON A VIEW OR COLUMN. 

The things I’m going to show you are ways you can mimic security and obfuscate some things.  This post is applicable to all versions of SharePoint and SharePoint Online in Office 365.

Here’s the example I’m going to use.  We’ll do a “Computer Issues” list, using the Issue Tracking list template (App).  A lot of times, people want an end user to be able to fill out a form, but they want certain fields to be unavailable in that form.  Think about any form where you’ve seen “Office Use Only” at the bottom.  When filling out a help desk request, we want them to be able to describe what’s wrong, and give it a category, but we don’t necessarily want them to be able to fill in the Assigned To and Due Date, and a couple of other things.  Here’s what the default “New Item” form looks like.  I have put red X’s on the fields that we don’t want end users to see, but we want someone else filling it out later.

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  1. Go to your list settings, and in the advanced settings, change Allow Management of Content Types to Yes.
    image
  2. Back on your list settings page, you’ll see a new section in there called Content Types. Now, this part will look a little different depending on what kind of list/library template you’re using, but since mine is an issues list, it has Issue as the only content type listed in there.  Click Issue (or whatever yours is).
    image
  3. Click the Assigned To field (this is the first one I want to hide).  Change it to Hidden, and click OK.
    image
  4. Go to each of the column names that you want to hide, and do step 3 for each one.  Then, your list of columns in the content type will look something like this:
    image
  5. Now, next time you are in this list and click the New Item button, this is what the form will look like:
    image
  6. Pretty simple so far, right?  Easy for the end users to fill forms out, but now what about those other people who need to be able to fill out other fields.  THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO DO THIS.  I’m just initially going to show you a pretty simple way.  First of all, there are the views.  We did not delete those columns, we simply hid them from the form.  We want people to be able to see their own issues, but not edit (or not even see) certain columns, and we want them to still be able to know what their statuses are. 
    Create a view called “My Issues” if there isn’t already one, and set the filter so that they only see stuff pertinent to them.  Make it the default view.

    (If you don’t know what a view is or how to modify it, here’s a reference.)

    image
  7. Once that view has been set as the default, delete all of the other views.  We want people to see a certain subset of information, and not the list of absolutely everything in the list or library.  We also need to make sure that they can’t create their own personal views there as well.  You can make a copy of the default permission level called Contribute, and call the new one “Contribute but no views” or something, and just remove the ability for people to be able to create their own personal views. 

    Note: You can even remove the ability for people to create alerts for themselves on that list as well, because a SharePoint alert would send them a lot of info that you may not want them to see.  (If you did this though, but still wanted them to be notified about the status of their ticket, then you’d have to create a workflow that sends them an email instead.)  You can just apply that permission level to certain people just on that one list.  Like, you’d want general users of the site to have this new permission level on the list, but for the people who are working tickets, you can let them have the “Contribute” level.

    Here are the items that I unchecked in this permission level:
    image
    image
    Reference: More on permission levels here.
  8. Next, this is where we address the concept of security on a view.  At the top right of your site, click the Gear, and choose Add a Page. Name it Full Issue List, or something to that effect.
  9. On your new page, click the Insert tab in the ribbon, and choose Web Part.  Find the name of the list or library that you’re working with in this example, click the name of it, and click the Add button.  I called mine Computer Issues.
    image
  10. There, now you have your list right there on this special page.  You can edit this list web part to make it show any columns you want to show, and make it show all of the items with no filter.
    Reference: Using the List View Web Part
  11. This next step is important.  The way that we’re putting security on this view, is by putting security on this specific page that we just created.  Save the page, then click the Page tab in the ribbon.  Click the View All Pages button.
    image
  12. This takes you to a library.  If this is a publishing site, it will be called Pages, otherwise it will be called Site Pages.  You’ll see the name of the page you just created listed here. 
    image
  13. Click the little ellipsis (…) next to your new page (Full Issue List), and choose Shared With.
    image
  14. Click the Advanced button.
    image
  15. Click Stop Inheriting Permissions at the top, and click OK.
    image
  16. Here is where it will be a bit unique to your specific solution.  I want the IT department to be able to see this page, but not anyone else, especially not the end users.  I’m giving the IT department Read permissions on this page.
    REMEMBER: This permission is on the page itself, that shows the view of the list.  This is not the permissions on the list itself.  So you’re probably thinking you need to give the IT department “Contribute” here, but they don’t really need it. 
    image
  17. Now you need to give the IT department a link to this special page.  You don’t want them to have to click Site Contents –> Site Pages –> and then click on this page to open it.  Here’s a quick way to get the URL (link) to this page, so you can stick it in the navigation or on the homepage or wherever.  Look at the screenshot above in step 13.  That little box that has the text that starts with http://…   That’s the URL, so you can select it and copy it to your clipboard.
  18. Okay, so what about the part where we want the IT department to be able to edit certain columns that other people can’t see on the form?  Here’s the super easy version.  Go to your super secret page (Full Issues List).  On this page, you can edit the view in this web part, add columns for all of the things users couldn’t fill out in the initial form, such as Due Date and Assigned To.
  19. When the IT department people go to this page, they can click on a row, and click the List tab in the ribbon.  When they click Quick Edit, there’s where they can edit all of the values in those columns!
    image
  20. This is what Quick Edit (datasheet view) looks like.  Like a spreadsheet.
    image
    Note: If you want to default it to this Quick Edit mode, you’d have to create that as a view on the list, then pick that view from the web part settings, then go back and delete the view from the list.

So far, we’ve created a list with a simple form that users can fill out, and a separate, secret view that only certain people can get to, with the additional fields to fill in.  What about having certain fields on the actual form show up according to a certain status of the item?  I wrote a blog post a long time ago, called Using Content Types as Statuses, which is still applicable today, with all versions of SharePoint and Office 365.  This will take you farther into the concept.  There are still more advanced ways to do some of this stuff, but I thought this post would at least get you going with some ideas.

Another thing to remember is that a lot of list types have a setting in them called Item-level Permissions, which is just a setting in the list’s advanced settings.  This doesn’t exist in libraries, though, and doesn’t exist in some templates like the Issue Tracking one I used in this example.  This is helpful in ensuring that users can’t see stuff in the list that doesn’t pertain to them, or that they can only edit their own things and not others’

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Here is the recording of the SharePoint Power Hour, where I did a demonstration of this whole thing, with lots of extra tips and tricks!

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January 21
Dynamic Excel Web Part

In all versions of SharePoint and Office 365, the Excel Web Access web part has been around for years.  It is part of the enterprise version of these products.  Web part connections can be created on pages in SharePoint, to send information between web parts. 

The requirement in this scenario is that a department has a bunch of spreadsheets in a document library. They are all similar, and the end users would like to be able to quickly flip between them while staying on the same page. 

This can be done with an Excel Web Access web part and the library on a web part page, using web part connections!  Here’s how:

What you already have:  A document library with a bunch of spreadsheets in them.  In my example, they are all exactly the same, just with different data in them. The tables, charts and named ranges are all exactly the same.  My library is called “Spreadsheets”.

  1. Create a web part page for this new dashboard.  A quick way to do this is to go to your “Site Pages” library, and in the Files tab, click the New Document drop-down, and choose Web Part Page.
  2. Give the web part page a name, double check that it’s being saved into the Site Pages library (or you can put it somewhere else, just pay attention to where it’s going), and click Create.
  3. On your new page, click the Edit Page button in the ribbon, and then click the Left column zone to Add a Web Part
  4. Add your library-full-of-spreadsheets, mine is called Spreadsheets.
    image
  5. On this same page, click Add a Web Part in the Right or middle column zone, and in the Business Data category, choose the Excel Web Access web part.
    image
  6. With the page in Edit mode again, click the little drop-down box at the top right of the Excel Web Access Web Part, and choose Connections –> Get Workbook URL From –> Spreadsheets (or whatever the name of *your* library is)
    image
  7. On the Configure Connection screen, choose Document URL, and click Finish.
    image
  8. Now stop editing, or save the page.  By default, the web part will show the first spreadsheet in the library, according to whatever order your data is sorted in that web part.  As you click the little gray double-arrow next to each spreadsheet, the web part on the right changes to show that spreadsheet!

image

In mine, I even have multiple named ranges and tables, so I can let the end user use that little drop-down at the top right of the Excel Web Access web part (that says AllProducts) to switch over to different parts of the spreadsheet!

1/23 update:  On SharePoint Power Hour this week, I did a demonstration of this solution.  Click to watch the video.

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January 19
Speaking at SPTechCon in Austin 2015

125x125This February is going to be exciting, as this is the first time that the SharePoint Technology conference (SPTechCon) is happening in Austin, Texas!  I’ll be presenting four sessions there, and here’s the info about them.  You can also get $200 off by using ROGERS as your registration code!

Feb_9

1:30pm - 2:45pm

Making the Most of the Out-Of-Box Web Parts

There are over 50 out-of-the-box web parts in the enterprise version of SharePoint! In this class, you will learn just how flexible and useful these Web parts are. Not only will you get a detailed look at the Filter, Excel, Social, Rollup and Media Web parts, but you will learn about a few new ones in SharePoint 2013 such as the Content Search Web Part. You will then learn how to customize some of these Web parts, see examples, demonstrations, and learn about new features. All of this is done without writing any code. Push SharePoint as far as you can using out-of-box functionality! This class is a mixture of 2010 and new 2013 Web parts.

Level: Intermediate; Audience: Information Worker Essentials


3:45pm - 5:00pm

Driving User Adoption, From a Technical Standpoint

Lori Gowin & Laura Rogers

When IT professionals set up the infrastructure of SharePoint, the subsequent task of end user adoption is often left to the business unit. During this process, the business unit will often turn to “The SharePoint Person” for help and guidance. Good news, IT Pros, there are useful technical configurations in the administration console to improve and increase user adoption. Ultimately this will improve user satisfaction with SharePoint and increase productivity. The instructors both began as SharePoint Administrators 11 years ago. The real world experience of implementing these practices will be integral in this class. Among the topics covered will be defining user audiences, improving Office integration with SharePoint, and demonstrations of improving how users can quickly and easily get to the information they need. When leaving this class, you will possess a specific action list that may be used to optimize their technical experience and drive user adoption.

Level: Intermediate; Audience: IT Pro Essentials


Feb_10

10:00 – 10:45

Panel Discussion


11:30am - 12:45pm

Creating an Approval Workflow, Part 1

Forms and documents are everywhere in your organization, and a lot of them must go through an approval process. SharePoint is such a flexible platform, it provides us with multiple methods that can be used to build our processes. In this class, learn about these different out-of-box ways to create a workflow around a form approval process. You will see the various alternatives when creating an approval workflow: content approval, out of box workflows, and the task process designer in a SharePoint Designer workflow. Quickly create and implement intuitive workflows for your critical IT and business systems, with no programming involved! The concepts in this class are applicable to both SharePoint 2010 and 2013. This is part one of a two-part presentation. This first part has only the simple and purely out-of-box settings and functionalities, geared toward beginners.

Level: Overview; Audience: Architecture Essentials


2:00pm - 3:15pm

Creating an Approval Workflow, Part II

Forms and documents are everywhere in your organization, and a lot of them must go through an approval process. SharePoint is such a flexible platform, it provides us with multiple methods that can be used to build our processes. Quickly create and implement intuitive workflows for your critical IT and business systems, with no programming involved! In this advanced class, learn about creating a completely custom new hire approval process. In this part two class, we will build out an HR onboarding workflow in SharePoint Designer, using a complex example that involves a process with both serial and parallel components, with multiple workflows. The concepts in this class are applicable to both SharePoint 2010 and 2013. This is part two of a two-part presentation.  This second part has only advanced concepts geared towards those who are already familiar with SharePoint Designer workflows, and does not contain any of the out-of-box workflow options taught in part one.

Level: Advanced; Audience: Architecture Essentials

January 12
SPChat on 1/15–Automating Business Processes

This Thursday, 1/15 on the SharePoint-Community site, I will be doing a SP Chat!  The topic will be automating business processes in SharePoint and Office 365.  The way it works is that the chat room is opened up for anyone to ask questions, and I answer them by typing my responses in the chat window in the order that they arrive.  Come check it out and sign up here:

SharePointChatPromoMasterLa

1/19 update: This has ended, but you can view the transcript here.

January 07
Working with Video Content in SharePoint 2013

I wrote this article back in 2012, for SD Times, and thought I’d go ahead and post it here also.  This also applies to Office 365, and Office 365 has a video portal feature as well.

In the SharePoint 2013 Preview and in the Office 365 Preview, there are some great hidden gems when it comes to working with video content. In this article, you will learn about adding and managing video content, and several ways to display that content on pages in SharePoint.

Where do I put my videos in SharePoint?

The first step is to create an asset library. From there, videos can be uploaded to the library just as you would add documents to a document library. Some interesting things happen behind the scenes each time a video is uploaded. Each video gets its own special page that displays more information about the video, as well as associated content. This screenshot shows a video called “Content Search” that has been uploaded, and the properties of it are displayed on the page as well.

image

How do I manage the properties of the video page?

After a video has been uploaded, click on the name of the video in the library, and then go to the Manage tab. Here are the important things to notice:


Edit Properties – The coolest thing on this screen (to me) is the ability to capture a video thumbnail right out of the video. The owner field defaults to the name of the person who uploaded the video, but it can be changed. There are also some checkboxes to indicate whether you want users to have the option of downloading your video or grabbing the embed code for it. You can also select the names of the people who are shown in the video.

Permissions – Decide whom you want to share this video with, if it needs to be different than the permissions for the library itself.

Manage Video Renditions – This setting is great because it allows accommodation for end users who may be on slower network connections. Different versions of the video with different bitrates may be uploaded here. When watching the video, end users will see a graph-like icon on the video that will let them switch between renditions.

Here is a screenshot of part of the Edit Properties screen:

image

Related items – Another cool new feature that you may have noticed in the first screenshot is the ability to include related items. For example, if my content search video has a Word document or two associated with it, those documents can be added as related content. Since each video has its own document set in here, those documents are contained within its document set.

Web Parts

Everything in this article so far has been confined to the library itself. What about situations where videos need to be displayed in Web Parts on other pages in the site? There are a couple of out-of-the-box Web Parts that are great at this:

Media Web Part – This Web Part has been around since SharePoint 2010. Simply add it to a page, then use the Media tab at the top to configure its properties, such as the video to look at and whether to play it automatically. This Web Part has been around since SharePoint 2010. Simply add it to a page, then use the Media tab at the top to configure its properties, such as the video to look at and whether to play it automatically.

Video as page content – Also, on publishing pages and wiki pages, media content can directly be inserted into content areas, and the configuration of the media itself is the same. When editing these types of pages, the Insert tab will contain an option for video. You can navigate to your SharePoint content, or use the embed code for any video from SharePoint or the Internet.

Content Search Web Part – This is a new Web Part in SharePoint 2013, along with a whole category of Web Parts called Search-Driven Content. Video content can be displayed in this Web Part, and there is a Web-Part setting called Control, which has a setting called Slideshow. Videos can be displayed in this slideshow style so that they can be scrolled through in a pretty graphical interface. This screenshot is of a Content Search Web Part on the home page, which shows one video at a time and has two total videos:

image

Video as page content – Also, on publishing pages and wiki pages, media content can directly be inserted into content areas, and the configuration of the media itself is the same. When editing these types of pages, the Insert tab will contain an option for video. You can navigate to your SharePoint content, or use the embed code for any video from SharePoint or the Internet.

November 21
Office 365: Information Rights Management

Information Rights Management is being rolled out to Office 365 right now.  I read about it here, and decided to go into my tenant and try it out.  This is very exciting!  What is Information Rights Management?  The quick explanation is that it lets you have tighter control over what happens to your files (mostly just MS Office files) once they have been emailed out or downloaded to people’s computers.  You can define things like whether they are allowed to print it, or even set the content to expire after a certain date.  This is not a new thing, but it’s always been something out of reach and very expensive, and now I see that it exists right there in my (Office 365 Enterprise E3) tenant!!!!

I tried it out today, and wanted to share with you the steps I went through to turn it on.  You need to be an Office 365 admin to be able to do this.

  1. In Office 365, at the top right, click the Gear or the Admin button and go to Office 365 Admin.
  2. Expand Service Settings on the left, and click Rights Management.
    image
  3. Click Manage.
  4. On the left it will say Rights Management is not activated.  Click the Activate button.  Do you want to activate Rights Management, click Activate.
    image
  5. Back at your Office 365 admin center, expand the Admin section on the left, and choose SharePoint.
  6. In your SharePoint admin center, click Settings on the left.
    image
  7. Scroll down to the Information Rights Management section, and choose Use the IRM service specified in your configuration.  Click Refresh IRM Settings.  Scroll down and click OK.  This won’t work if you haven’t done all the previous steps.  I know, because this is the part that I tried first.  Winking smile
    image
  8. Now go to the library in SharePoint that you would like to protect with Information Rights Management.  (note that this is something completely different than an information management policy).  Go to the Library Settings page.
  9. Click Information Rights Management.
    image
  10. Check the box to restrict permissions on this library on download.  Give it a name and description.
    image
  11. Click the Show Options link in gray.  THIS IS AWESOME.  This stuff only applies to the file when people open it in the client software, and has nothing to do with what can be done with the file if they’re looking at it in the browser. 
    image
  12. You can read all about these additional settings here:  Apply Information Rights Management to a list or library.  Notice that under the Configure document access rights, I left a bunch of boxes unchecked.  This only applies to people who only have SharePoint permissions to read or view these files.  I don’t want them to be able to print it, and I don’t even want them to be able to type in it at all.  Click OK.
  13. I logged in as a user who only has read permissions to this library.  Notice that when I click the File menu, the options such as Save, Save As, and Print are grayed out:
    image
    Also, when I try to type in the file, simply nothing happens.  This is so cool, people as for this type of thing ALL the time!  Oh, and by the way, when using IRM, apparently there is no more option to edit the file in the browser using Office Web Apps.

Here are some reference links:

Using Azure Rights Management: http://technet.microsoft.com/library/en-us/jj585006

Office 365 trust center: http://trust.office365.com/

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Laura Rogers @WonderLaura
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